Associate in Science

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The Associate in Science (AS) degree is intended for students who want to transfer to a four-year university or college and major in science and math disciplines such as chemistry, biology, math, pre-med, pre-vet, and physics.

Program Description

The Associate in Science degree shall be granted for a planned program of study consisting of a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit (SHC) of college transfer courses. Within the degree program, the institution shall include opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and the basic computer use.

Courses are approved for transfer through the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA). The CAA enables North Carolina community college graduates of two-year associate in science programs who are admitted to constituent institutions of The University of North Carolina to transfer with junior status.

Community college graduates must obtain a grade of "C" or better in each course and an overall GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale in order to transfer with a junior status. Courses may also transfer through bilateral agreements between institutions.

Transfer Information

Learning Outcomes

  • Be able to communicate in quantitative terms and analyze and interpret quantitative data specific to their disciplines.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the scientific method, models, and basic foundational scientific theories, and be able to apply sound scientific reasoning to problems.
  • Achieve college-level competence in written communication, composing clear, organized, and focused documents which demonstrate mastery in research and documentation skills, use of evidence, supporting details, analysis, and mechanical accuracy.
  • Achieve college-level competence in oral communication by demonstrating proficiency in these professional verbal communication skills: planning clear and coherent presentations appropriate to audience; composing and organizing content; using effective transitional devices; and engaging verbal communication with effective delivery techniques.
  • Acquire technology skills enabling them to achieve a variety of academic, work-related, and personal goals.
  • Demonstrate the ability to think critically about diverse perspectives.

Contact Information

Image of Darrell Finney
Darrell Finney, MA
Dean of Arts and Sciences
Phone: 336-838-6187
rdfinney632@wilkescc.edu

Pathways

Course Requirements

Course Requirements

    First Year - Fall Semester
    • ACA 122 College Transfer Success

      This course provides information and strategies necessary to develop clear academic and professional goals beyond the community college experience. Topics include the CAA, college policies and culture, career exploration, gathering information on senior institutions, strategic planning, critical thinking, and communications skills for a successful academic transition. Upon completion, students should be able to develop an academic plan to transition successfully to senior institutions.

    • BIO 111 General Biology I

      This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels.

    • ENG 111 Writing and Inquiry

      This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English.

    • MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra

      This course is designed to develop topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology.

    First Year - Spring Semester
    • BIO 112 General Biology II

      This course is a continuation of BIO 111. Emphasis is placed on organisms, evolution, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels.

    • ENG 112 Writing/Research in the Disc

      This course, the second in a series of two, introduces research techniques, documentation styles, and writing strategies. Emphasis is placed on analyzing information and ideas and incorporating research findings into documented writing and research projects. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources using documentation appropriate to various disciplines.

    • MAT 172 Precalculus Trigonometry

      This course is designed to develop an understanding of topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangles, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology.

    • History

      Select ONE course from HIS 111, HIS 112, HIS 131, HIS 132

    First Year - Summer Term
    • CHM 151 General Chemistry I

      This course covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM 152.

    • CHM 152 General Chemistry II

      This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields.

    Second Year - Fall Semester
    • GEL 111 Geology

      This course introduces basic landforms and geological processes. Topics include rocks, minerals, volcanoes, fluvial processes, geological history, plate tectonics, glaciers, and coastal dynamics. Upon completion, students should be able to describe basic geological processes that shape the earth.

    • MAT 152 Statistical Methods I

      This course provides a project-based approach to introductory statistics with an emphasis on using real-world data and statistical literacy. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Upon completion, students should be able to use appropriate technology to describe important characteristics of a data set, draw inferences about a population from sample data, and interpret and communicate results.

    • MAT 271 Calculus I

      This course is designed to develop the topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology.

    • POL 120 American Government

      This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy process. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system.

    Second Year - Spring Semester
    • COM 231 Public Speaking

      This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support.

    • MAT 272 Calculus II

      This course is designed to develop advanced topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on the applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to integral-related problems with and without technology.

    • PHY 251 General Physics I

      This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

    • English Literature

      Select ONE course from ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 241, ENG 242

    Course Requirements

      First Year - Fall Semester
      • ACA 122 College Transfer Success

        This course provides information and strategies necessary to develop clear academic and professional goals beyond the community college experience. Topics include the CAA, college policies and culture, career exploration, gathering information on senior institutions, strategic planning, critical thinking, and communications skills for a successful academic transition. Upon completion, students should be able to develop an academic plan to transition successfully to senior institutions.

      • CHM 151 General Chemistry I

        This course covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM 152.

      • ENG 111 Writing and Inquiry

        This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English.

      • MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra

        This course is designed to develop topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology.

      • PSY 150 General Psychology

        This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology.

      First Year - Spring Semester
      • CHM 152 General Chemistry II

        This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields.

      • ENG 112 Writing/Research in the Disc

        This course, the second in a series of two, introduces research techniques, documentation styles, and writing strategies. Emphasis is placed on analyzing information and ideas and incorporating research findings into documented writing and research projects. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources using documentation appropriate to various disciplines.

      • MAT 143 Quantitative Literacy

        This course is designed to engage students in complex and realistic situations involving the mathematical phenomena of quantity, change and relationship, and uncertainty through project- and activity-based assessment. Emphasis is placed on authentic contexts which will introduce the concepts of numeracy, proportional reasoning, dimensional analysis, rates of growth, personal finance, consumer statistics, practical probabilities, and mathematics for citizenship. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize quantitative information as consumers and to make personal, professional, and civic decisions by decoding, interpreting, using, and communicating quantitative information found in modern media and encountered in everyday life.

      • MAT 172 Precalculus Trigonometry

        This course is designed to develop an understanding of topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangles, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology.

      • History

        Select ONE course from HIS 111, HIS 112, HIS 131, HIS 132

      Second Year - Fall Semester
      • MAT 152 Statistical Methods I

        This course provides a project-based approach to introductory statistics with an emphasis on using real-world data and statistical literacy. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Upon completion, students should be able to use appropriate technology to describe important characteristics of a data set, draw inferences about a population from sample data, and interpret and communicate results.

      • MAT 271 Calculus I

        This course is designed to develop the topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology.

      • PHY 151 College Physics I

        This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

      • English Literature

        Select ONE course from ENG 231, ENG 232, ENG 241, ENG 242

      Second Year - Spring Semester
      • COM 231 Public Speaking

        This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support.

      • MAT 272 Calculus II

        This course is designed to develop advanced topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on the applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to integral-related problems with and without technology.

      • MAT 280 Linear Algebra

        This course provides an introduction to linear algebra topics. Emphasis is placed on the development of abstract concepts and applications for vectors, systems of equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, multi-dimensional linear transformations, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, diagonalization and orthogonality. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the theoretical concepts and select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to linear algebra-related problems with and without technology.

      • PHY 251 General Physics I

        This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

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