Robotics, Automation, and Mechatronics Technology

Home/Programs/Manufacturing/Applied Engineering Technology/Robotics, Automation, and Mechatronics Technology

The Robotics, Automation, and Mechatronics Technology curriculum prepares students to use basic engineering principles and technical skills to develop, install, calibrate, modify, and maintain automated systems.

Students will receive instruction in computer systems; electronics and instrumentation; programmable logic controllers (PLCs); electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic control systems; actuator and sensor systems; process control; robotics; and applications to specific industrial tasks.

The graduates of this curriculum will be prepared for employment in industries that utilize control systems; computer hardware and software; and electrical, mechanical, and electromechanical devices in their automation systems.

Learning Outcomes

  • Evaluate and assess industrial work environments and practices to ensure compliance with relevant safety standards.
  • Design, construct and troubleshoot electrical circuits for applications including control systems, communications, signal processing and computer networks.
  • Utilize mechanical drawings and CAD software to communicate technical information.
  • Articulate and defend technical solutions to diverse audiences using mathematics, oral and written communication.
  • Diagnose, repair, and maintain equipment and processes within their area of specialization.

Job Outlook

Annual demand for Engineering Technology General in our service area is currently 189 job openings. This is expected to decrease by 0.6% in the next year.

Contact Information

Image of Keith Casey
Keith Casey, AAS
Lead Instructor - Computer Engineering and Robotics
Phone: 336-838-6486
ikcasey998@wilkescc.edu

Pathways

Course Requirements

    First Year - Fall Semester
    • ACA 115 Success & Study Skills

      This course provides an orientation to the campus resources and academic skills necessary to achieve educational objectives. Emphasis is placed on an exploration of facilities and services, study skills, library skills, self-assessment, wellness, goal-setting, and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able to manage their learning experiences to successfully meet educational goals.

    • ATR 112 Intro to Automation

      This course introduces the basic principles of automated systems and describes the tasks that technicians perform on the job. Topics include the history, development, and current applications of robots and automated systems including their configuration, operation, components, and controls. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the basic concepts of automation and robotic systems.

    • EGR 111 Engineer Comp and Careers

      This course introduces principles, fields of study, computational tools and techniques used in engineering and engineering technology. Topics include use of word processors, spreadsheets, databases, math editors, graphics and CAD packages, simulators, symbolic and numerical math solvers, and other related application software. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize computer applications in an engineering career.

    • ELN 133 Digital Electronics

      This course covers combinational and sequential logic circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, medium scale integration (MSI) and large scale integration (LSI) circuits, analog to digital (AD) and digital to analog (DA) conversion, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot digital circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

    • ISC 112 Industrial Safety

      This course introduces the principles of industrial safety. Emphasis is placed on industrial safety and OSHA regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of a safe working environment and OSHA compliance.

    • MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I

      This course provides an integrated approach to technology and the skills required to manipulate, display, and interpret mathematical functions and formulas used in problem solving. Topics include the properties of plane and solid geometry, area and volume, and basic proportion applications; simplification, evaluation, and solving of algebraic equations and inequalities and radical functions; complex numbers; right triangle trigonometry; and systems of equations. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results.

    First Year - Spring Semester
    • DFT 119 Basic CAD

      This course introduces computer-aided drafting software for specific technologies to non-drafting majors. Emphasis is placed on understanding the software command structure and drafting standards for specific technical fields. Upon completion, students should be able to create and plot basic drawings.

    • ELC 117 Motors and Controls

      This course introduces the fundamental concepts of motors and motor controls. Topics include ladder diagrams, pilot devices, contactors, motor starters, motors, and other control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to properly select, connect, and troubleshoot motors and control circuits.

    • ELC 131 Circuit Analysis I

      This course introduces DC and AC electricity with an emphasis on circuit analysis, measurements, and operation of test equipment. Topics include DC and AC principles, circuit analysis laws and theorems, components, test equipment operation, circuit simulation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret circuit schematics; design, construct, verify, and analyze DC/AC circuits; and properly use test equipment.

    • ENG 110 Freshman Composition

      This course is designed to develop informative and business writing skills. Emphasis is placed on logical organization of writing, including effective introductions and conclusions, precise use of grammar, and appropriate selection and use of sources. Upon completion, students should be able to produce clear, concise, well-organized short papers.

    • HYD 110 Hydraulics/Pneumatics I

      This course introduces the basic components and functions of hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Topics include standard symbols, pumps, control valves, control assemblies, actuators, FRL, maintenance procedures, and switching and control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the operation of a fluid power system, including design, application, and troubleshooting.

    First Year - Summer Term
    • ELC 128 Intro to PLC

      This course introduces the programmable logic controller (PLC) and its associated applications. Topics include ladder logic diagrams, input/output modules, power supplies, surge protection, selection/installation of controllers, and interfacing of controllers with equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to understand basic PLC systems and create simple programs.

    • ELC 130 Advanced Motors/Controls

      This course covers motors concepts, construction and characteristics and provides a foundation in motor controls. Topics include motor control ladder logic, starters, timers, overload protection, braking, reduced voltage starting, SCR control, AC/DC drives, system and component level troubleshooting. Upon completion, students should be able to specify, connect, control, troubleshoot, and maintain motors and motor control systems.

    Second Year - Fall Semester
    • ATR 212 Industrial Robots

      This course covers the operation of industrial robots. Topics include the classification of robots, activators, grippers, work envelopes, computer interfaces, overlapping work envelopes, installation, and programming. Upon completion, students should be able to install, program, and troubleshoot industrial robots.

    • ATR 215 Sensors and Transducers

      This course provides the theory and application of sensors typically found in an automated manufacturing system. Topics include physical properties, operating range, and other characteristics of numerous sensors and transducers used to detect temperature, pressure, position, and other desired physical parameters. Upon completion, students should be able to properly interface a sensor to a PLC, PC, or process control system.

    • ATR 219 Automation Troubleshooting

      This course introduces troubleshooting procedures used in automated systems. Topics include logical fault isolation, diagnostic software usage, component replacement techniques, and calibration; safety of equipment; and protection of equipment while troubleshooting. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and troubleshoot an automated system.

    • ELN 131 Analog Electronics I

      This course introduces the characteristics and applications of semiconductor devices and circuits. Emphasis is placed on analysis, selection, biasing, and applications. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot analog circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

    • HUM 110 Technology and Society

      This course considers technological change from historical, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on human needs and concerns. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of technological change. Upon completion, students should be able to critically evaluate the implications of technology.

    Second Year - Spring Semester
    • COM 231 Public Speaking

      This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support.

    • ELN 229 Industrial Electronics

      This course covers semiconductor devices used in industrial applications. Topics include the basic theory, application, and operating characteristics of semiconductor devices. Upon completion, students should be able to construct and/or troubleshoot these devices for proper operation in an industrial electronic circuit.

    • ELN 260 Prog Logic Controllers

      This course provides a detailed study of PLC applications, with a focus on design of industrial controls using the PLC. Topics include PLC components, memory organization, math instructions, documentation, input/output devices, and applying PLCs in industrial control systems. Upon completion, students should be able to select and program a PLC system to perform a wide variety of industrial control functions.

    • PSY 118 Interpersonal Psychology

      This course introduces the basic principles of psychology as they relate to personal and professional development. Emphasis is placed on personality traits, communication/leadership styles, effective problem solving, and cultural diversity as they apply to personal and work environments. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of these principles of psychology as they apply to personal and professional development.

    • EGR 285 or WBL 111 and WBL 121 or WBL 112

      Design Project or Work-Based Learning I and Work-Based Learning II or Work-Based Learning I

    Course Requirements

      Fall Semester
      • ACA 115 Success & Study Skills

        This course provides an orientation to the campus resources and academic skills necessary to achieve educational objectives. Emphasis is placed on an exploration of facilities and services, study skills, library skills, self-assessment, wellness, goal-setting, and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able to manage their learning experiences to successfully meet educational goals.

      • ATR 112 Intro to Automation

        This course introduces the basic principles of automated systems and describes the tasks that technicians perform on the job. Topics include the history, development, and current applications of robots and automated systems including their configuration, operation, components, and controls. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the basic concepts of automation and robotic systems.

      • EGR 111 Engineer Comp and Careers

        This course introduces principles, fields of study, computational tools and techniques used in engineering and engineering technology. Topics include use of word processors, spreadsheets, databases, math editors, graphics and CAD packages, simulators, symbolic and numerical math solvers, and other related application software. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize computer applications in an engineering career.

      • ELN 133 Digital Electronics

        This course covers combinational and sequential logic circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, medium scale integration (MSI) and large scale integration (LSI) circuits, analog to digital (AD) and digital to analog (DA) conversion, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot digital circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

      • ISC 112 Industrial Safety

        This course introduces the principles of industrial safety. Emphasis is placed on industrial safety and OSHA regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of a safe working environment and OSHA compliance.

      • MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I

        This course provides an integrated approach to technology and the skills required to manipulate, display, and interpret mathematical functions and formulas used in problem solving. Topics include the properties of plane and solid geometry, area and volume, and basic proportion applications; simplification, evaluation, and solving of algebraic equations and inequalities and radical functions; complex numbers; right triangle trigonometry; and systems of equations. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results.

      Spring Semester
      • DFT 119 Basic CAD

        This course introduces computer-aided drafting software for specific technologies to non-drafting majors. Emphasis is placed on understanding the software command structure and drafting standards for specific technical fields. Upon completion, students should be able to create and plot basic drawings.

      • ELC 117 Motors and Controls

        This course introduces the fundamental concepts of motors and motor controls. Topics include ladder diagrams, pilot devices, contactors, motor starters, motors, and other control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to properly select, connect, and troubleshoot motors and control circuits.

      • ELC 131 Circuit Analysis I

        This course introduces DC and AC electricity with an emphasis on circuit analysis, measurements, and operation of test equipment. Topics include DC and AC principles, circuit analysis laws and theorems, components, test equipment operation, circuit simulation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret circuit schematics; design, construct, verify, and analyze DC/AC circuits; and properly use test equipment.

      • ENG 110 Freshman Composition

        This course is designed to develop informative and business writing skills. Emphasis is placed on logical organization of writing, including effective introductions and conclusions, precise use of grammar, and appropriate selection and use of sources. Upon completion, students should be able to produce clear, concise, well-organized short papers.

      • HYD 110 Hydraulics/Pneumatics I

        This course introduces the basic components and functions of hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Topics include standard symbols, pumps, control valves, control assemblies, actuators, FRL, maintenance procedures, and switching and control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the operation of a fluid power system, including design, application, and troubleshooting.

      Summer Term
      • ELC 128 Intro to PLC

        This course introduces the programmable logic controller (PLC) and its associated applications. Topics include ladder logic diagrams, input/output modules, power supplies, surge protection, selection/installation of controllers, and interfacing of controllers with equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to understand basic PLC systems and create simple programs.

      • ELC 130 Advanced Motors/Controls

        This course covers motors concepts, construction and characteristics and provides a foundation in motor controls. Topics include motor control ladder logic, starters, timers, overload protection, braking, reduced voltage starting, SCR control, AC/DC drives, system and component level troubleshooting. Upon completion, students should be able to specify, connect, control, troubleshoot, and maintain motors and motor control systems.

      Course Requirements

      • DFT 119 Basic CAD

        This course introduces computer-aided drafting software for specific technologies to non-drafting majors. Emphasis is placed on understanding the software command structure and drafting standards for specific technical fields. Upon completion, students should be able to create and plot basic drawings.

      • ELC 117 Motors and Controls

        This course introduces the fundamental concepts of motors and motor controls. Topics include ladder diagrams, pilot devices, contactors, motor starters, motors, and other control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to properly select, connect, and troubleshoot motors and control circuits.

      • ELC 131 Circuit Analysis I

        This course introduces DC and AC electricity with an emphasis on circuit analysis, measurements, and operation of test equipment. Topics include DC and AC principles, circuit analysis laws and theorems, components, test equipment operation, circuit simulation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret circuit schematics; design, construct, verify, and analyze DC/AC circuits; and properly use test equipment.

      • HYD 110 Hydraulics/Pneumatics I

        This course introduces the basic components and functions of hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Topics include standard symbols, pumps, control valves, control assemblies, actuators, FRL, maintenance procedures, and switching and control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the operation of a fluid power system, including design, application, and troubleshooting.

      Course Requirements

      • ATR 212 Industrial Robots

        This course covers the operation of industrial robots. Topics include the classification of robots, activators, grippers, work envelopes, computer interfaces, overlapping work envelopes, installation, and programming. Upon completion, students should be able to install, program, and troubleshoot industrial robots.

      • ATR 219 Automation Troubleshooting

        This course introduces troubleshooting procedures used in automated systems. Topics include logical fault isolation, diagnostic software usage, component replacement techniques, and calibration; safety of equipment; and protection of equipment while troubleshooting. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and troubleshoot an automated system.

      • ELN 229 Industrial Electronics

        This course covers semiconductor devices used in industrial applications. Topics include the basic theory, application, and operating characteristics of semiconductor devices. Upon completion, students should be able to construct and/or troubleshoot these devices for proper operation in an industrial electronic circuit.

      • ELN 260 Prog Logic Controllers

        This course provides a detailed study of PLC applications, with a focus on design of industrial controls using the PLC. Topics include PLC components, memory organization, math instructions, documentation, input/output devices, and applying PLCs in industrial control systems. Upon completion, students should be able to select and program a PLC system to perform a wide variety of industrial control functions.

      Technical Standards

      The Applied Engineering – Robotics, Automation, and Mechatronics Technology program technical standards have been developed to inform students of the nonacademic essential functions of the program and profession. Examples are not all inclusive.

      Standard Essential Function Examples
      Communication
      Oral / Written
      • Skills sufficient to communicate information and ideas so others will understand
      • Communicate with coworkers and customers
      Mobility / Motor Skills
      • Motor skills sufficient to move the hands and use hands to grasp or manipulate objects
      • Ability to perform basic computer functions
      • Mobility sufficient to perform physical activities that require considerable use of arms and legs and moving the whole body
      • Ability to safely operate in and around electricity
      • Visually inspect, move, and control a robot
      • Work with electrical wiring
      • Enter data into a computer, open, save, and close files and programs
      • Physical activities may include:
        • Stooping
        • Crawling
        • Reaching
        • Squatting
        • Lifting
        • Bending
      • Use a meter to test, verify, or troubleshoot an energized circuit
      Physical Strength and Stamina
      • Ability to participate in an activity for long periods of time
      • Work on a project for up to six continuous hours
      Sensory

      • Sight
      • Sound
      • Taste
      • Touch
      • Smell
      • Visual skills sufficient to see details at close range
      • Ability to distinguish colors, shades, and textures
      • Visual skills to inspect or assess for safety
      • Listening skills sufficient to communicate with others
      • View blueprints, sketches, and schematic drawings
      • Work with wires of different colors
      • Inspect an area or piece of equipment for potential failures or safety issues
      • Hear others inside of an industrial shop or in the field by voice, loud speaker, phone, and/or two-way radio
      Environmental / Occupational Exposure
      • Possible exposure to extreme noise levels
      • Possible exposure to dust, chemicals, and fumes
      Field or Industry Professional Standards
      • Safely operate tools and equipment

      Disability Services Statement

      Wilkes Community College is an ADA compliant institution. WCC does not discriminate based on a disability in the admissions process or in access to its programs, services, and/or activities for qualified individuals who meet eligibility requirements. WCC will provide reasonable accommodations for individuals with documented disabilities who are eligible to receive or participate in college programs, services, and/or activities. If a student believes that he/she cannot meet one or more of a program’s essential functions without accommodations, the student is encouraged to disclose this to Disability Services as soon as possible.

      2+2 Information

      A 2+2* agreement is an opportunity for students to complete their Associate's degree at Wilkes Community College and then transfer into a specified program at a partnering four-year institution for their Bachelor's degree. Wilkes Community College has the following 2+2 agreements for our Robotics, Automation, and Mechatronics Technology graduates:

      * The 2+2 model is the proposed timeframe, but may be subject to change.

      Enroll in Robotics, Automation, and Mechatronics Technology